Getting Pregnant

Ovulation Period

Ovulation Period

When do I ovulate?

There is no foolproof way to know when you will ovulate as the signs of ovulation varies from woman to woman just like menstrual cycles are different from woman to woman.

Since getting pregnant is tied to ovulation, it is important to get familiar with its symptoms, signs and know how to track it.

Tracking these symptoms can be tricky for a lot of women especially those who haven’t taken note of these signs or those with irregular menstrual cycles, but over a couple of months of monitoring and paying attention to these common symptoms and signs, you are able to narrow down when your ovulation may occur and know the best time to have sex , or try intrauterine insemination for baby making purpose. You can also read our previous article on ovulation symptoms.

Listed below are ways to predict and know when you’ll most likely to ovulate.

1.The Calendar Method

While this method is the easiest way to estimate your fertile window, it is not always accurate because ovulation does not usually happen exactly 14 days before next period even for people with very regular menstrual cycles.

This is how the calendar method works for women with pretty regular cycles. You count back 14 days from when you expect your next period., that’s halfway through your cycle. Let’s say you start your period 1st of a particular month and you expect your next period on 28th , you’ll be fertile on days 10 through 15. Your fertile window includes the day you ovulate and the preceding five days. You’re more likely to get pregnant if you have sex at least every other day between days 10 and 14

2. Track Your Body Temperature

You can track and note subtle rises and dips in your body temperature over a couple of months to see a pattern that can help you plot your fertile window.

At the start of your menstrual cycle, your basal body temperature remains constant but just as you approach your ovulation, there is a notable decrease in your temperature which is followed by a rise in this body temperature just after ovulation. You can measure your body temperature by using a special thermometer. To get accurate readings, measure your temperature right after you wake up, while you’re still in bed. Keep this readings over a few months, you may notice a pattern that shows when you ovulate

You can also track subtle changes in your basal body temperature (BBT), cervical mucus, and cervical firmness for a few cycles to try to determine when you ovulate.

3. Ovulation Predictor Kits

These kits which can be bought at drugstores measure your levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), which can be detected in your urine. They test your urine to measure your levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), which go up in the 24 to 36 hours before you ovulate.These kits work because ovulation typically hits about 10 to 12 hours after LH peaks—on day 14 to 15 of the menstrual cycle if your cycle is 28 days long. Your LH concentration should stay elevated for 14 to 27 hours to allow for full maturation of the egg.

The kits have enough test strips to let you check your LH levels several times during your menstrual cycle. Start testing a few days before you think you might ovulate, then repeat a few times over the next few days to pinpoint the exact day. When your LH levels are highest, you’re in the fertile window.

4. Consult With Your Doctor

As we stated earlier, the times of ovulation varies, so if you are still having a tough time figuring it out or if your menstrual cycle is not regular, ask your doctor.

Using a combination of these methods is likely to be most accurate.

 

Other Ovulation Symptoms

Some women may experience other symptoms when they’re ovulating. These are called secondary signs and may not happen as consistently, if at all, for many women.

They include: Heightened sense of smell, taste

  • Mild cramping or pain on one side of the pelvis
  • Abdominal bloating
  • Tenderness of breasts
  • Light spotting
  • Increased sex drive
Next article Pregnancy Symptoms
Previous article Hello world!

Related posts